ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Linkage of Multidimensional Poverty and Per Capita Income

A District-level Analysis in Uttar Pradesh

Funding: This research is supported by the University Grants Commission, New Delhi (UGC Post-doctoral Fellowship for Women Candidates). The author’s conclusions are her own and do not necessarily represent the views of any organisation. Conflicts of Interest: The author declares that there is no conflict of interest. The author gratefully acknowledges the constructive comments of the anonymous referee. The author is also thankful to the study participants for their kind and unconditional support. The participants were explained about the purpose of the study and informed consent was taken. Rashmi Shukla (rshukla1176@gmail.com) teaches economics at the Department of Humanities and Social Sciences, Integral University, Lucknow.

Funding: This research is supported by the University Grants Commission, New Delhi (UGC Post-doctoral Fellowship for Women Candidates). The author’s conclusions are her own and do not necessarily represent the views of any organisation.

Conflicts of Interest: The author declares that there is no confl ict of interest.

The author gratefully acknowledges the constructive comments of the anonymous referee. The author is also thankful to the study participants for their kind and unconditional support. The participants were explained about the purpose of the study and informed consent was taken.

Analysis at macro and micro level reveals that the districts and zones with higher per capita income in Uttar Pradesh have a lower percentage of multidimensional poverty index poor and the condition of non-notified slums in terms of both poverty measures is deplorable. Moreover, an inverse relationship between per capita income and multidimensional poverty exists. So, the government should provide employment-oriented education and technical training for skill development especially for slum dwellers so that they can increase their income and can come out of the poverty trap.

Traditionally, poverty1 has been measured by a unidimensional framework in India. Dadabhai Naoroji was the first one who estimated poverty based on the cost of subsistence diet in his book, Poverty and Un-British Rule in India in 1901. Further, a minimum standard of living was proposed for the basis of poverty estimation by the National Planning Committee in 1938 and the authors of the Bombay Plan in 1944 (NITI Aayog 2023). The working group in 1962, Dandekar and Rath in 1971, and the task force led by Y K Alagh were the expert groups that worked on poverty estimation post independence.

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Updated On : 13th Feb, 2024
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