A+| A| A-

Majoritarian Politics and the Ayodhya Verdict

The Ayodhya verdict favours politics over history. It bypasses the settled principles of legal scrutiny in adjudicating land conflicts. Such a verdict has detrimental ramifications for democracy and constitutional values. 

On 9 November 2019, the Supreme Court delivered the final judgment in the much awaited Ayodhya–Babri Masjid land dispute case. The citizens by and large, welcomed the verdict. The Court’s judgment has succeeded in settling the inordinately delayed land dispute by providing the right of possession of land to one party over another. The order, however, has wider implications for the culture, society, economy and polity of the country. This judgment will become a reference document for future generations to understand and reflect upon how law intersects with historicity, religion, and crucially, the political economy of the country. 

Contrary to the general understanding that the court judgments are beyond the purview of politics, this order of the apex court conveyed the impression that it is amenable to the political circumstances and factors, especially in dealing with sensitive land dispute cases. It is true that the Constitution provides a governing framework for the country. However, it is the politics that determines the form, shape and direction of the governance. The judiciary is a constituent part of the whole institutional arrangement of governance. To understand the verdict from the perspective of politics in particular, it is important to understand the majoritarian regime of the contemporary times, and get a comprehensive picture of the interface between law, polity and society. 

To read the full text Login

Get instant access

New 3 Month Subscription
to Digital Archives at

₹826for India

$50for overseas users

Updated On : 3rd Apr, 2020

Comments

(-) Hide

EPW looks forward to your comments. Please note that comments are moderated as per our comments policy. They may take some time to appear. A comment, if suitable, may be selected for publication in the Letters pages of EPW.

Intellectually fearless, never one to shrink away from a debate, baiting others to challenge his analysis, C P Bhambri was a formidable presence...

The COVID-19 pandemic has landed firms across the globe in an unfamiliar terrain.

The goods and services tax (GST) was rolled out across the country on 1 July 2017.

Early in the lockdown, India had relative control over curbing the potential spread of COVID-19, and may have prevented as many as five times more...

The National Education Policy, 2020 unveiled finally seeks to usher in major structural reforms in higher education. Among many measures,...

The COVID-19 pandemic and the resultant lockdown led to the closure of all markets in Manipur, including the Tribal Market Complex in Imphal East...

Coherent national strategies, backed by regional cooperation efforts, offer a way forward for economic recovery in South Asia, which is rapidly...

Sections 357 and 357-A of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973 lay down the procedure for granting compensation to the victims of crime. Under the...

The COVID-19 pandemic has provocatively challenged the extant paradigm of development whose theoretical underpinning is derived from the...

The first report of the Fifteenth Finance Commission has allayed many fears that arose after the notification of the terms of reference of the...

Back to Top