Potential to Tame American Imperialism?

Belt and Road Initiative

American unilateralism has become a problem for the world. Post the Cold War, American hegemony has become inimical to world peace. After more than 25 years, there is a glimmer of hope on the horizon. Both Russia and China are geographically destined to offer resistance against a unipolar world. However, the two are most likely to fail if they challenge the United States militarily. They can challenge American power peacefully by diverting international trade away from the oceans towards Eurasian land routes. The new Silk Road initiative by China, and unity hold the key to a peaceful world.

A fresh world order is taking root. The China–Russia combine is positioning itself to alter the global balance of power equation. The erstwhile Marxist twins, important pillars of BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa), are now capable of rocking—if not capsizing—the American imperial applecart. The American interference in South China Sea disputes and their penchant to use terror outfits with Islamic names, first in Afghanistan and now in Syria, has severely destabilised peace in the world. This is leading to a dangerous situation where the media and think tanks have already started talking in terms of World War III. Russia, with tacit support from China, is sticking its head out against the unilateral actions taken by the United States (US). In September 2016, their navies held joint exercises in the South China Sea. China is also beginning to work alongside Russia in Syria to challenge the wanton destruction of the West Asia nations by the US.

But, more than the Sino–Russian combined military strength, it is their natural connectivity that provides the key to the new world order. The two continental powers, tethered together by geography, are best placed to end the Western dominance of the world.

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