ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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The Indian Voter’s 2014 Mandate

Play in the States

Though the "Modi wave" has become the trope to explain the unprecedented results of the 2014 general elections, a different picture emerges when we disaggregate these results and understand them in the context of state-level politics. This article, first, analyses where the Modi effect did not work, and second, re-examines the issue of development and what it means when we say that the Indian voters handed down a mandate in favour of a developmental agenda.

As the dust settles on the 2014 general elections, the general consensus is that Indian voters renounced their social identity tags when they went to the polling booths this summer. The National Democratic Alliance’s (NDA) resounding win and the rise of Narendra Modi to power are seen as a decisive vote for the Gujarat model of development. There are two main arguments that this article seeks to advance. First, though the “Modi wave” has become the trope to explain these unprecedented results, a different picture emerges when we disaggregate these results and understand them in the context of state-level politics. To understand the Modi effect, we need to analyse where it did not work. Second, we need to re-examine the issue of development and what it means when we say that the Indian voters handed down a mandate in favour of a developmental agenda.

Past Unravelling or Same Old?

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