ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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The Intelligence Bureau and Its Not Very Intelligent Report on NGOs

The reports of the Intelligence Bureau should facilitate, not hinder, people-oriented development; and strengthen, not erode, the democratic processes. For this to be possible, the report on any given subject should be well-researched, accurate and comprehensive. Then and only then can an intelligence report help the government and serve the public interest. The now-infamous IB report on non-governmental organisations fails to meet these criteria. The treatment of the Vedanta project in Odisha is an example of the one-sided treatment in the report.

The reports of the Intelligence Bureau should facilitate, not hinder, people-oriented development; and strengthen, not erode, the democratic processes. For this to be possible, the report on any given subject should be well-researched, accurate and comprehensive. Then and only then can an intelligence report help the government and serve the public interest. The now-infamous IB report on non-governmental organisations fails to meet these criteria. The treatment of the Vedanta project in Odisha is an example of the one-sided treatment in the report.

The Intelligence Bureau’s (IB) document criticising foreign-funded non-governmental organisations (NGOs), now available in the public domain,1 has provoked all-round protests from civil society. In a way, this controversy epitomises the recurring conflict between security considerations and civil liberties in democracies all over the world.

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