ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

A+| A| A-

Trapped in Behaviouralism

socio-cultural values and power structure are bound to vary from one area to another. And there is no gainsaying that most of them can only be highlighted in the course of in-depth studies which go far beyond a large survey analysis. But Ghatak. does not seem to comprehend all these implications and it is not his casual references to socio-politico-cultural factors which can alter our fundamental impression. Unlike several much more reasoned econometricians, Ghatak seems to be only interested in quantifying whatever data can be gathered on his table on a particular topic he has selected. No wonder that we also find him constantly complaining about the lack of adequate data. This dearth of data is unmistakeably true. But the real question to ask is whether it is not premature to go ahead with refined analysis when the data base is so very narrow. In the circumstances, should we not consider giving the highest, priority to building up the badly needed data bank ? Indeed most of the conclusions reached by Ghatak are so vague and qualified with so many re- servations (of the kind: "this conclusion should be regarded as tentative and subject to further rigorous tests on the basis of fresh data", p 213) that we can legitimately raise the problem of the relevance of his approach at least in the present state of our knowledge.

To read the full text Login

Get instant access

New 3 Month Subscription
to Digital Archives at

₹826for India

$50for overseas users

Comments

(-) Hide

EPW looks forward to your comments. Please note that comments are moderated as per our comments policy. They may take some time to appear. A comment, if suitable, may be selected for publication in the Letters pages of EPW.

Back to Top