ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Back to Bipolarity

Back to Bipolarity?
IF Harold Wilson believed in all the arguments that he used to advance in defence of his bast of Suez policy, his decision to withdraw British forces from this region could have been interpreted as reflecting a most cynical disregard of the interests of peace in Asia and the world. But others knew as much as Wilson did, that British presence in distant parts of the world was largely a historical accident and even it it served no special purpose it had to be maintained because it was painful to give up the British pretension of being a world power. If he has now decided to withdraw, the reasons for ft arc only partly financial. It is becoming clear that the pay-off a nation gets by playing second fiddle to a super power is not commensurate with the investment required for this purpose: Franco had realised this much earlier; so had China. But Britain's decision is unique because, unlike the other two junior great powers, she has taken an exactly opposite course and opted out of the power race itself.

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