ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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Refuge in Foreign Affairs

 THROUGHOUT his visit to Rumania, de Gaulle stressed the identity of roles being played by Bucharest and Paris in the world today. Both have consistently tried to loosen the alliances to which they belong and both have struggled against the kind of internationalism that provided legitimacy to the super powers' dominance over their allies. la fact, the role that the non-aligned nations attempted to play in the fifties with considerable success has now been taken over by the disgruntled allies of Russia and America. France in the West and Rumania in the East have been the leaders of this new movement. An unprecedented fit of modesty must have restrained de Gaulle from claiming that he symbolised the trend much more than Ceaucescu. The General's grand vision of restructuring the world is still distinctively French and Ceau- cescu has no such pretensions. But objectively, what it has done is no less significant.

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