ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Articles by Vani S KulkarniSubscribe to Vani S Kulkarni

Subjective Well-being in India

Subjective well-being is now an important area of research. We carried out the first all-India analysis of swb focused on economic well-being based on the only all-India panel survey that covers 2005 and 2012. While economic factors such as affluence and employment are important covariates, age, gender, health, caste, and schooling are other important covariates. Existing policies fail to provide adequate protection to old people living with non-communicable diseases and disabilities. An important challenge going forward is strengthening policies that will enable healthy ageing.

Non-communicable Diseases, Affluence, and Gender

Whether the burden of non-communicable diseases has shifted to older men and women, and whether it varies by marital status and affluence of the household has been examined. The analysis is based on the 60th and 71st rounds of the National Sample Survey for 2004 and 2014. Even though comparisons of prevalence and shares between men and women are relied on in the analysis, some glaring disparities emerge. The growing menace of NCDs in the context of a rapidly increasing older population calls for bold policy initiatives, which are currently either underfunded or limited in coverage and uncoordinated. A drastic overhaul of the health system and behavioural changes are thus emphasised.

Has Disability Risen among the Elderly in India?

An analysis of disability among the elderly and its covariates during the period 2005–12 is provided using data from the two rounds of the nationally representative India Human Development Survey, conducted in 2005 and 2012. The increase in life expectancy has not translated into a healthier life, as prevalence of disabilities, their severity, and their association with non-communicable diseases have risen. Given the lack of access to assistive devices, specialised medical services, rehabilitation, and stigma attached to disability, the temptation to offer simplistic but largely medical solutions must be resisted. Instead, a multidimensional strategy is needed that helps the elderly overcome physical and socio-economic barriers as well as address the issues related to prevention and treatment of their underlying health conditions.
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