ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Articles by T Sabri ÖncüSubscribe to T Sabri Öncü

Is Turkey Thriving?

Turkey's ruling party, the Justice and Development Party or AKP, has built its fortunes by following an aggressive neo-liberal programme which has boosted the finance, real estate and tourism sectors. With the economy weakening, the AKP fears erosion of its support base; this explains why the party can brook no criticism of its economic policies.

The Standing Man of Turkey

The upsurge of protest in Turkey is not the result of any deeprooted conspiracy or a few miscreants letting loose their animal spirits, as the government would have it. Rather, it is a spontaneous outburst of anger from ordinary people who have borne the brunt of the Erdogan administration's neo-liberal growth model for the last decade.

The Standing Man of Turkey

The upsurge of protest in Turkey is not the result of any deep-rooted conspiracy or a few miscreants letting loose their animal spirits, as the government would have it. Rather, it is a spontaneous outburst of anger from ordinary people who have borne the brunt of the Erdogan administration’s neoliberal growth model for the last decade.

Government's Gift to SBI Shareholders

In August 2010, the then Union Finance Minister Pranab Mukherjee sought to cut the government’s stake in the State Bank of India (SBI) from 55% to 51% and push the bank to raise more capital from the market. Good idea.

A Provocative Perspective on India's Financial Sector

Economic Policies and India's Reform Agenda:New Thinking by Y V Reddy (Hyderabad: Orient BlackSwan), 2013; pp xvi + 275, price not indicated.

Challenges to Financial Inclusion in India

Focusing on the institutional challenges to financial inclusion in Andhra Pradesh, this paper argues that it is the inability of formal financial institutions to meet the specific needs of the poor that has enabled informal service providers to fill the vacuum. Without a paradigm shift, especially on the part of banks, financial inclusion is bound to fall short of expectations. It proposes that the banking sector should look at efforts to expand inclusion not as a capital cost or as a charitable expense, but as a long-term investment in the future. The soundness of such an investment is borne out in the success of individual business correspondents in some districts of the state.

Pages

Back to Top