ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

Articles by Sona MitraSubscribe to Sona Mitra

COVID-19 and Women’s Labour Crisis: Reiterating an Inclusive Policy Response

The covid-19 pandemic in India has had an unequal impact on women in a number of ways. In terms of economic opportunity, it has been seen that more women lost jobs compared to men and fewer have been able to rejoin labour force. This is in the context of gendered labour markets where female labour force participation has been low and declining. This paper presents an analysis of the situation of women’s employment pre-lockdown and some indications on what the impact of Covid-19 could be, based on microstudies and other literature available. Further, the adequacy of the social protection and employment generation programmes of the government that are specifically aimed at improving female labour force participation is assessed.

A Gender-responsive Policy and Fiscal Response to the Pandemic

It is important to include women and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex+ persons in the monitoring and accountability mechanisms of the government. A policy that is based on gender concerns and a gender-sensitive fiscal response to the ongoing health crisis as well as the period after that is the need of the hour.

Data Anomalies in NSSO–EUS Figures, 2011–12

The major rounds of Employment–Unemployment Surveys conducted by the National Sample Survey Office every five years provide a continuous, robust, and reliable source of employment statistics in India. However, a closer analysis of the unit-level figures for the latest round of eus reveals disparities in the details of the industry–occupation information.

Patterns of Female Employment in Urban India

This paper analyses the all-India trends in the rate of growth of employment of urban women, especially in manufacturing, services and trade, based on four employment-unemployment NSS surveys (1983 to 1999-2000) and the census estimates. The increased rate of growth of output in this period has not been translated into increased employment opportunities for urban women workers. The paper also analyses the sectoral shares of employed females, the annual average rate of growth of employment for urban women and the employment patterns. It shows an increase in the regular but subsidiary activities of urban women workers along with rising open unemployment rates and deteriorating work conditions in terms of lower wages and lack of non-wage remuneration.
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