ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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JAMMU AND KASHMIR-Congress(I) s Short-Sighted Game

December 3, 1983 JAMMU AND KASHMIR Congress(I)'s Short-Sighted Game Balraj Puri CONGRESS (I) highlighted two major issues in its call for Bandh in Jammu region on November 7. First, the 'anti-national role' of Farooq Abdullah and his government. Second, attitudes of 'discrimination against Jammu' by this government.

JAMMU AND KASHMIR- Assertion of Regional Personalities and Emergence of Two Party System

JAMMU AND KASHMIR Assertion of Regional Personalities and Emergence of Two Party System Balraj Puri CONTROVERSY over the conduct of the Assembly elections in June, and interpretation of their results, have yet not ended. Electoral battles, moreover, extended beyond polling day in the form of physical clashes between followers of the two major contenders for power. And political polemics have not lost their virulence.

The Era of Sheikh Mohammad Abdullah - II

The era of Sheikh Mohammad Abdullah was marked by a single-minded assertion by the people of Kashmir of their identity. The question of their external affiliation – constitutionally, politically and emotionally – had, more or less, been stabilised during the life-time of the leader who had symbolised Kashmiri aspirations uninterruptedly for over half a century. This paper attempts a retrospective assessment of the era of Sheikh Abdullah and the prospects for the future development of Kashmiri identity within the state as well as in the country. The paper is divided into four sections. Section I traces the historical assertion of Kashmiri identity in the context of political awakening in the state which first took the form of Muslim consciousness and opposition to Dogra rule but which soon shed its exclusive Muslim character and become a struggle against monarchy itself. Section II delineates the various regional identities within the state of Jammu and Kashmir and the attempts of the National Conference, representative organisations of the overwhelming majority of the population in the Valley, to incorporate them within its fold. Sections III and IV, consider the continuing efforts to evolve a composite identity for the state and the obstacles in the emergence and consolidation of such an identity. Sections I and II of the paper appeared last week. Sections III and IV are published below.

The Era of Sheikh Mohammed Abdullah - I

The era of Sheikh Mohammad Abdullah was marked by a single-minded assertion by the people of Kashmir of their identity. The question of their external affiliation – constitutionally, politically and emotionally – had, more or less, been stabilised during the life-time of the leader who had symbolised Kashmiri aspirations uninterruptedly for over half a century. This paper attempts a retrospective assessment of the era of Sheikh Abdullah and the prospects for the future development of Kashmiri identity within the state as well as in the country. The paper is divided into four sections. Section I traces the historical assertion of Kashmiri identity in the context of political awakening in the state which first took the form of Muslim consciousness and opposition to Dogra rule but which soon shed its exclusive Muslim character and become a struggle against monarchy itself. Section II delineates the various regional identities within the state of Jammu and Kashmir and the attempts of the National Conference, representative organisations of the overwhelming majority of the population in the Valley, to incorporate them within its fold. Sections III and IV, which will be published next week, consider the continuing efforts to evolve a composite identity for the state and the obstacles in the emergence and consolidation of such an identity. Sections I and II of the paper appeared last week. Sections III and IV are published below.

Political Folklore

Balraj Puri Freedom Movement in Kashmir by Ghulam Hassan Khan; Light and Life, New Delhi; pp 523, Rs 140. BY 'freedom movement' we generally mean the movement that was aimed at liberating the country from British rule. In the case of Kashmir, however, the expression refers to a movement which was started, in a regular and organised manner, in July 1931 and was primarily directed against the rule of an alien Dogra monarch.

Sheikh Mohammad Abdullah, 1905-82

was not, of course, possible in a foreign land, in the face of the foreign press, to simply deny that she had ever made the slip at all and condemn misreporting on the part of the press, which is the standard procedure in similar situations within the country.

JAMMU AND KASHMIR-Route of Ladakh s Integration

Route of Ladakh's Integration Balraj Puri LADAKH has been an uneasy part of Jammu and Kashmir ever since it was annexed by the Dogra army led by wazir Zurawar Singh in 18-34. Ethnically, culturally and spiritually the Buddhists of Leh have felt closer to Tibet than to the Dogras or the Kashmiris ui the state.

KASHMIR-Limits of Brinkmanship

KASHMIR Limits of Brinkmanship Balraj Puri THE ambivalents of the Sheikh Abdullah-Indira Gandhi relationship has by now revealed the broad limits of their love and hate. The Sheikh is too much preoccupied with the installation of his son Farooq Abdullah as his successor not only as president of the ruling National Conference but, more importantly, as leader of the 50- year old political movement led by him. He would not tolerate any distraction in the Valley and would not bother about any developments outside it.

Problems and Prospects of Federalisation-The Case of Jammu and Kashmir

Problems and Prospects of Federalisation The Case of Jammu and Kashmir Balraj Puri THE process of Indian federalisation has had many vicissitudes in Jammu and Kashmir since independence. It had a glorious start when a Muslim majority state, which had long borders with and all communication outlets to Pakistan, opted of its free will to accede to India. The process suffered a dramatic reverse in 1953. The reverse trend continued to worsen and reached its nadir in 1965. The reintegration process started thereafter and took a qualitative turn in 1971. By 1977, the course of federalisation had completed a full circle when secessionist movement in the state had lost all incentive and its raison d' etre. All the political parties of India:, including the erstwhile Jana Sangh, which became a constituent unit of the Janata party in 1977 and reincarnated itself as the Bharatiya Janata party in 1980, are now reconciled to continuance of Article 370 of the Constitution and the special status of Jammu and Kashmir. Even the demand for further revision in this status by a Kashmiri leader in order to enlarge its autonomy, though generally not favoured, does not provoke suspicion about his patriotism in the rest of the country.

JAMMU AND KASHMIR-What Is Wrong with Kashmir s Finances

What Is Wrong with Kashmir's Finances? Balraj Puri THE Finance Minister of Jammu and Kashmir devoted most of his budget speech to taking "a glance over a period of last six years" and appraise the achievements of the state. A new era did start six years ago when a leader of the standing of Sheikh Abdullah took over the reins of the state government, Thus, the Finance Minister reminds us, "started a process of a very bold overhaul of the state's economic administration".

Alienated Segments of India

Alienated Segments of India Balraj Puri Politics of Minorities: Some Perspectives by Moin Shakir; Ajanta Publications, New Delhi, 1980; pp 172; Rs 60.

KASHMIR-State Stranglehold on Universities

State Stranglehold on Universities Balraj Puri SHEIKH Abdullah's known enthusiasm for enlarging the autonomy of Jammu and Kashmir state vis-a-vis the Centre is rarely reflected in applying the principles of autonomy to its internal affairs.

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