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Cold War 2.0

Despite professing Non-Alignment, India effectively became a pawn in the hands of the Western powers as it walked into the trap of the 1962 Sino-Indian war. As a new Cold War builds up between China and the United States, would India be able to avoid its past mistakes?

Civil-Military Relations

Army and Nation: The Military and Indian Democracy since Independence by Steven I Wilkinson, Permanent Black in association with Ashoka University, 2015; pp 295, Rs 795.

Silk Routes versus Sea Lanes

The Chinese strategy is to build rail and road links over the Eurasian landmass to escape the vice-like grip over maritime trade routes exercised by the United States and its allies. An exploration of the possible consequences, drawing on history, for China, the Western powers, India and the global trade and military architecture.

Mask and Masculinity of Indian Strategy

For two centuries and more the Anglo-Saxon world has convinced India that its interests are best catered to under their protective gaze. Will India be able to break out of this hegemony?

A Cuckoo Strategy on China

Deep Currents and Rising Tides: The Indian Ocean and International Security edited by John Garofano and Andrew J Dew (Washington DC: Georgetown University Press), 2013; pp xvii + 331, $32.95. Asymmetrical Threat Perception in India-China Relations by Tien-sze Fang (New Delhi: Oxford University Press), 2014; pp xv + 247, Rs 795. Samudra Manthan: Sino-Indian Rivalry in the Indo-Pacific by C Raja Mohan (Washington DC: Carnegie Foundation), 2012; pp xii + 360, $19.95. Chinese and Indian Strategic Behavior: Growing Power and Alarm by George J Gilboy and Eric Heginbotham (New York: Cambridge University Press), 2012; pp xxx + 376, £22.99.

Admiral D K Joshi's Resignation

The resignation of the chief of naval staff has failed to halt the series of gas-leak episodes in the Indian Navy. An important lesson from Admiral Joshi's resignation is that India's security and civil-military equation is linked not just to the speed of arms procurement, but also to the ironing out of differences on the maritime policy front.

Aircraft Carriers Do Not Offer a Strategic Panacea

Aircraft carriers, despite their great cost, have always been seen as strategically important by the Indian Navy due to what must be a misplaced sense of grandeur. Today, they are seen as vital for India to establish a naval presence as a world power, even as they have lost their signifi cance elsewhere.

The China-India Relationship

India has got itself trapped into an anti-Chinese matrix set in place by the United States. This has led to a situation where the military is increasing its say in foreign and domestic policy and pushing aggressive postures on to the civilian government. Unless India abandons its aspirations to great power status and pursues a foreign policy which builds on Asian cooperation and strengths, it will continue to become cannon fodder for western strategic aims.

Sino-Indian Relationship: New Paradigm

India has trapped itself into an anti-Chinese matrix set in place by the United States. This has led to a situation where the military is increasing its say in foreign and domestic policy and pushing aggressive postures on to the civilian government. Unless India abandons its aspirations to great power status and pursues a foreign policy which builds on Asian strengths and cooperation, it will continue to become cannon-fodder for Western strategic aims.

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